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Our Solar System is in Deep Water; New Water Discovered On 2 Moons


by Leslie Gabriel March 23, 2015

Water is the foundation of life, and the possibility of life on other planets. As scientists learn more about our solar system and the nature of different planets, it is not surprising that they are learning more than they expected; however, some of those discoveries have amazing implications for humanity and life on earth. The possibility of life on other planets is no longer just science fiction. Scientists have discovered that there is actually water on the moons of other planets in our solar system.

The Discovery

On March 12, 2015, NASA scientists have made an unexpected discovery: two moons in our solar system have water. In fact, Ganymede, the largest moon that orbits Jupiter, actually has an ocean. The Jupiter moon has a frozen surface and a recent discovery found that the cold surface is actually hiding salt water.

On Enceladus, a small moon that orbits Saturn, a similar discovery is making waves in the scientific community. It was discovered that Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, actually has a hot spring below the surface of the moon. A previous probe of the moon discovered that the ocean below the surface is roughly 6 miles deep; however, more recent information made is clear that certain portions of the water are actually warm. That warm water suggests that there are natural hot springs on the moon.

Implications of Water Discoveries

Learning about the possibility of water on other planets and moons throughout the solar system suggests that there is a possibility of life on other planets and even within the same solar system. Since Saturn is far from the sun, the fact that the moon has hot water suggests that there are chemical reactions that occur to create the warmer temperatures. Since life is not possible in excessively cold temperatures, finding that the water is actually warm in some locations provides key information about the possibility of learning about new lifeforms and finding more details about the possibilities for humans in the future.

Water and Life

Water is essential for human, animal and plant life. Nearly 60 percent of the human body is composed of water. Without enough water, humans, plants and animals will die. Discovering water in other areas of the solar system suggests that life is sustainable on different planets. It also raises questions about the possible implications for discovering new forms of life on other planets and moons.

Finding water on two moons that surround planets in our solar system is exciting. It suggests that there are new discoveries that we can make each year. Whether discoveries occur in our own oceans or they occur in the oceans on Enceladus and Ganymede, we are able to learn more about the earth and the universe that surrounds our planet.

Here is video about the water findings H

 Here is a video tidbit about the water findings on Jupiter's Moon Ganymede

 




Leslie Gabriel
Leslie Gabriel

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