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We Call It Water Consciousness


by Leslie Gabriel January 30, 2014

There's a rapidly growing increase in global consciousness about the issues that effect the world's water. We see this awareness expressed in a variety of events and activism such as:

This planetary movement to love and protect water is played out in thousands of large and small ways every day by people from every walk of life. My story, the story of three grandmothers on a mission to spread water consciousness begins, appropriately, at the headwaters of a river.

On March 22, 2013, World Water Day, three gray-headed women took the short hike from the Mt. Shasta City Park parking lot to the headwaters spring of the Sacramento River.  Each woman held a recycled gallon jug in one hand and a clutch of thornless roses in the other; the roses were an offering to show the water love. After heartfelt prayers of gratitude for the luxury of clean water we  tossed our roses into the water and knelt, one by one, to drink from the spring and fill our containers.

The youngest woman of our trio inspired the trip because she was studying about water consciousness and the work of Dr. Masuru Emoto. “Did you know that when bottles of water have different words written on them the water molecules take on different shapes?” she asked one afternoon when we were all having lunch together. “Did you know that World Water Day is coming up and we should go do something to give water respect – you know it hardly gets any.”

No, we didn’t know about water consciousness. No, we didn’t know about World Water Day, but yes, we should definitely do something to give water the respect it deserves.  After that day we threw ourselves into a mission of water advocacy inspired by Dr. Emoto's work.

We decanted our fresh spring water into dozens of small glass jars embellished with positive words like "love," "respect," "gratitude" and "health" and gave these gifts to friends, neighbors or strangers we encountered day to day. We had no way of knowing if our good intentions actually changed the shape of the water molecules inside those bottles, but it changed us. With our new water insight to motivate us we look forward to the next World Water Day, it's always March 22, and we're already planning our second headwaters journey. This time we're taking our grandchildren.




Leslie Gabriel
Leslie Gabriel

Author

Leslie Gabriel, CEO & Founder - An H2O activist, enthusiast and ambassador for water. After beating lifelong chronic skin rashes and other ailments, by simply using pure water to detox his body and mind, Leslie became a passionate believer in the power of water. A majority of Leslie's time is spent on what he considers the most important movement of modern times, The Water Sustainability Movement. He is a public speaker about the pressing need of water sustainability and the need to transform our relationship to water to a state of love and respect. Leslie Gabriel is also proud father of, who he calls, his "Not So Little People" - Kyla Elianna Gabriel (21) and Jeremiah Noah Gabriel (17). Leslie Gabriel is also an distance runner, hiker, skier, kayaker, camper, traveler and dancer.



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