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Water to Power Our Planet


by Leslie Gabriel January 18, 2014

Water is an incredible source of natural energy on our planet. Water powers our bodies, ecosystems and hydro electric power, powers large parts of our planet. 

Water already serves as an energy source for 150 countries! Energy from water is unmatched by any other fuel source. When water is moved at a rapid rate, the kinetic energy can be easily converted into electricity. 

While large scale Hydropower has big, big issues, let's look at some of the positive aspects of hydropower ...

Unlike burning oil or gas, obtaining electricity from water does not pollute the air. Hydro power can achieve efficiency greater than 95% and have no harmful fuel emissions. Water and power go hand in hand because the natural fuel is plentiful. When matched with proper scaling and environmental awareness, the act of generating hydropower can well for the environment. 

Two styles of Hydropower hold much promise for a sustainable future ... 

  1. A new technology called Tidal Power is a newer form of hydropower that converts the energy of tides into useful forms of power - mainly electricity. While not in wide usage, it has potential for future electricity generation. 
  2. Also, gaining ground is Micro Hydropower, a type of hydroelectric power that typically produce up to 100 kilowatts of electricity using the natural flow of water - no dams needed. These installations can provide power to an isolated home or small community, or are sometimes connected to electric power networks.

Let's face it, large scale hydropower does have issues ...

On the downside, large scale dam construction and ocean turbine construction interrupts the natural habitat of fish and other wildlife. Large scale manmade dams displace people, many animals and lead to negative effects on local ecosystems. 

If creative, environmentally friendly engineers, ecologists and environmentalists can find a way to protect living creatures from these impacts - like with Micro Hydropower, or with Tidal Power - then hydropower is clearly a really smart choice for a renewable energy future on our Earth.

Here is a little video on a Micro Hydropower project in Nepal.




Leslie Gabriel
Leslie Gabriel

Author

Leslie Gabriel, CEO & Founder - An H2O activist, enthusiast and ambassador for water. After beating lifelong chronic skin rashes and other ailments, by simply using pure water to detox his body and mind, Leslie became a passionate believer in the power of water. A majority of Leslie's time is spent on what he considers the most important movement of modern times, The Water Sustainability Movement. He is a public speaker about the pressing need of water sustainability and the need to transform our relationship to water to a state of love and respect. Leslie Gabriel is also proud father of, who he calls, his "Not So Little People" - Kyla Elianna Gabriel (21) and Jeremiah Noah Gabriel (17). Leslie Gabriel is also an distance runner, hiker, skier, kayaker, camper, traveler and dancer.



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